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The Chevrolet ZZ632/1000 Big-Block V8 Crate Engine Costs $37,758.72

The inflation problem is nowhere close to being solved, but that doesn’t explain the MSRP of the Chevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8. Retailing at $37,758.72 on GM Performance Motor, the monster engine costs more than a Chevrolet Silverado 1500 (from $29,300) or a Camaro ($25,000).
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Chevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8 crate engineChevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8 crate engineChevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8 crate engineChevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8 crate engineChevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8 crate engineChevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8 crate engineChevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8 crate engineChevrolet ZZ632/1000 big-block V8 crate engine
How is that even possible? Well, there is no replacement for displacement, and the ZZ632 certainly abides by these words. The 10.35-liter behemoth is the most powerful crate motor ever offered by General Motors, a hot-rodding masterpiece that cranks out an incredible 1,004 aspirated ponies.

The free-breathing mill is further listed with 876 pound-feet (1,188 Nm) of torque at 5,600 revolutions per minute by GM Performance Motor, which is a tremendous amount when compared to many land missiles. The Demon comes to mind with its 6.2-liter supercharged HEMI that develops a crazy 840 horsepower and 770 pound-feet (1,044 Nm) on high-octane fuel.

Obviously enough, these numbers wouldn’t have been possible without serious hardware. The ZZ632/1000 is a tall-deck block, namely the CNC-machined Bowtie Sportsman block with a forged roller assembly. Crank-trigger ignition with coil-near-plug ignition coils mounted on a unique valley plate, a hydraulic roller camshaft, spread-port cylinder heads derived from Pro Stock racing technology, forged aluminum pistons, a forged steel crankshaft, and forged steel H-beam connecting rods also need to be mentioned, along with a Holley Dominator 4500-style throttle body and a high-rise air intake.

What’s most impressive about the ZZ632/1000 is that it rocks the hot-rodding world the old-fashioned way, as in cast iron for the block and overhead valves. Not intended for marine applications, the aspirated engine requires an internally balanced flywheel if you want a manual rather than a torque-converter automatic. But alas, the 10.35-liter mill doesn’t feature a starter, high-pressure fuel pump, or air cleaner despite its insane MSRP.

When all is said and done, it’s hard to imagine Chevy turning a profit from selling this fellow. The price limits demand for this incredible motor, but on the other hand, marketing through performance is what Chevy does best.
 
 
 
 
 

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