autoevolution

Beautifully Restored 1936 Ford Custom Pickup Flexes Its Muscles, Has Three Pedals

This kind of car shows a distinct personality and provides more than just a strong image of a legendary vehicle; it is that kind of build that can express its feelings.
11 photos
Custom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford PickupCustom 1936 Ford Pickup
After the Great Depression, car companies started to get back on their feet, and Ford quickly reacted. It introduced the Model 48 in 1935 and expanded its lineup with new versions, including the Roadster, the 1936 pickup, the De Luxe, and the Model B "Woodie," making them in large quantities. It featured the famous flathead V8 engine, also known as "flattie," and huge communities built around these models. While some people prefer them stock, others modify them to the max, such as this 1936 Custom Pickup, which is up for grabs on Bring a Trailer by Ztruckman from California.

The owner performed a strip-down and rebuilt painstaking process based on the same curved chassis and the original bodywork panels. In addition, it installed a new custom hood with open sides instead of the side, slatted panels. Thus, it is easy for everyone to see what engine put this vehicle in motion, but we'll get back to it later. At the front, the shield-shaped black grille is surrounded by a chromed rim.

With a bodywork painted in a dark-gray color with a mirror-look finish and 15" five-spoke chromed alloys, this pickup is impossible to go unnoticed. Right in front of the rear wheels, the exhausts peek under the side steps. In the bed, the builder placed a wooden floor with a clear finish and chromed metallic strips. The tailgate features the same stamped, handwriting lettering of the original Ford pickup truck from 1936.

Unfortunately, the interior doesn't look like it benefits from the same attention to detail. While the builder chose to install classic-looking dials from Omega Kustom instruments with a digital odometer that shows 674 miles (1,084 km) since being rebuilt. That steering wheel, though, doesn't fit appropriately for this build. Moreover, its low-back bucket seats finished in vinyl and gray centers don't look that great for the rest of this build.

Finally, despite the ceiling-mounted Alpine stereo unit and the gray microsuede door panels and black carpeting, the overall appearance of the cabin is that it was finished in a hurry. Fortunately, these things are the easiest to replace. But that Hurst shifter and the pedals are right on the spot. We also appreciate the modern touch that added power windows and the Vintage Air AC unit.

Under the hood, the builder chose a Ford V8 powerplant. But it is not the same flattie from the '30s. It is, in fact, a short-stroke small-block 347 V8 Ford powerplant with aluminum heads. While the seller didn't say anything about the engine's power, it said in one of the videos that it has all the data and the spec-sheets of this unit. All we know is that some engine manufacturers got 415 hp and 415 lb-ft (563 Nm) of torque. It is paired to a five-speed Tremec manual gearbox and sends its power to the rear wheels via a Ford 9" Positraction rear end with a 3.70:1 gearing.

For the suspension, the builder made a smart choice and replaced the former rigid axle with an independent system carried over from a Mustang II. For the rear, it went for a four-link setup. The car also features chrome QA1 coilovers in all corners. Stopping power is ensured via a power-braking system with discs all-around.

This 1936 Ford Custom Pickup auction will end on November 9th, and by the time of writing, there were only two bids at $10,000. It is definitely a car worth taking a look at and, if you buy it, change that interior.

Editor's note:

This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.
 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories